Category Archives: Recipes

Recipe: Green Cabbage Salad

Photo by freestocks.org on Pexels.com

I have posted one or more cabbage recipes on this blog. Use the search box if interested.

When I was a wee lad, my mother never served cabbage. Don’t know why.

Adam Piggott is a good writer. He claims he has the best cabbage recipe ever. Here ’tis:

Ingredients:

  • 1 fresh green cabbage
  • Salt
  • Cumin
  • Apple [cider] vinegar
  • Extra virgin olive oil.

Remove the rough outside leaves of the cabbage and then cut it into quarters. Using a mandoline slicer or a grater, carefully shave the cabbage as thinly as possible. 

Now add the other ingredients in the order in which I listed them. Then mix well together and leave to sit for a few hours. Yes, a few hours and the longer the better. A minimum of one hour but if you can leave it all afternoon then you will thank me. This is why I was worried about them running out at the lunch. The cabbage will release some fluids over this time. Check for seasoning and olive oil before serving as you may have to add a little more.

His original post didn’t include specific amounts of most ingredients. Adam elaborated in the comments section:

Yes, the amounts are the issue here and it is what makes this a unique dish. Salt is the key. I use a large salt grinder which you can see in the last photo. I had half a cabbage for lunch and I would say that I used a good half tablespoon of salt. I added a little more at the end. Remember though with salt – you can always add more but you can’t take any away.

I used a quarter teaspoon of cumin. You’re just after a hint of the taste there. A small splash of the vinegar. Too much vinegar becomes overpowering; you can always add more later if you think you need it. Olive oil you can give it a good splash. Looking at the bowl of cabbage you should not see any liquid oozing out of the bottom. If you do then you have used too much oil or vinegar.

You can definitely refrigerate it but you don’t have to. If you do then you should cover it with cling film.

Read Adam’s entire post. It’s not long. You won’t regret it.

Steve Parker, M.D.

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Recipe: Low-Carb Salads

Photo by Chan Walrus on Pexels.com

20 recipes from Diet Doctor:

Many people think of salads as boring diet food that will leave you hungry and unsatisfied. But we disagree. Our keto salad recipes are rich in protein — and they’re filled with nutrition, flavors, and healthy fats to keep you fueled all day long.

Steve Parker, M.D.

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Recipe: Breakfast Mushrooms

Click for the recipe.

That looks and sounds scrumptious to me! (That’s a word, right?)

My wife and daughter would never try this. There’s just something about mushrooms, they say. Can’t even stand the smell.

Posting this here for future reference. Just a matter of time…

Steve Parker, M.D.

h/t Jan at The Low Carb Diabetic blog.

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Recipe: Low-Carb Zuppa Toscana

Photo by Riccardo Bertolo on Pexels.com

DJ Foodie has come up with a low-carb version of zuppa toscana, my wife’s favorite soup at Olive Garden restaurants. I prefer the pasta e fagioli. We haven’t tried it yet but post a link here for future reference. 9.4 net carbs per 330 calorie serving.

Steve Parker, M.D.

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Leafy Greens Can Kill You!

Not sure if this is chicken or tuna salad with walnuts and grapes

Periodically there are outbreaks of illness caused by eating contaminated leafy greens. The contaminants are usually bacteria such as E coli and Salmonella. The illness is typically diarrhea, sometimes with belly cramps, nausea, and vomiting. And rare deaths.

Cathe Friedrich published an interesting article about this phenomenon. Here are a few bullet points (I haven’t independently verified):

  • Leafy greens such as lettuce are linked to 22% of food poisoning outbreaks over over the last 10 years
  • The riskiest leafy green is bagged, ready-to-serve lettuce

A few ways to avoid foodborne illness:

  • Avoid pre-packaged leafy greens
  • Avoid sprouts
  • Keep the produce refrigerated and dry
  • Consume before the expiration date

Click for leafy green food safety tips from the Canadian government.

Click for a harrowing story at Consumer Reports about E coli poisoning from romaine lettuce.

Consumer Reports article on the safest ways to eat salad.

Steve Parker, M.D.

h/t Jan at The Low Carb Diabetic

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Recipe: Japanese-Style Salmon and Avocado Salad

If image owner (who?) objects to me posting the image, let me know and I’ll delete it.

This looks and sounds intriguing but I haven’t tried it yet. I’ve never combined avocado and salmon in an entree. I never imagined I’d like avocado in chicken soup, but it’s become a Parker Compound favorite.

Click for recipe at Tesco Real Food.

Steve Parker, M.D.

h/t/ Jan at The Low Carb Diabetic

PS: I couldn’t find the nutrition breakdown at Tesco Real Food, but Jan came up with this:

Nutrition Per Serving (1/4 of the total): Carbohydrate 4.3g Protein 28.7g Fibre 1.4g Fat 41g

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More Low-Carb Mediterranean Diet Recipes

Ketogenic compatible

Check out Diet Doctor for over 60 low-carb Mediterranean diet recipes! Diet Doctor usually provides carbohydrate counts, so you can fit these into the Low-Carb Mediterranean Diet.

Click on “recipes” at left for my own low-carb Mediterranean diet recipes.

Steve Parker, M.D.

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Recipe: Sous Vide Chicken and Sauteed Sugar Snap Peas

Sous vide chicken and sautéed sugar snap peas

Click the pic for our YouTube demonstration.

This is so low-carb that you can eat it in a ketogenic diet.

Ingredients:

2 boneless skinless chicken breasts, 8-9 oz each (225-255 g each) (raw weight)

2.5 tbsp (37 ml) extra virgin olive oil

few sprigs of fresh rosemary (optional)

2 cloves garlic, diced

lemon-pepper seasoning

Montreal Steak Seasoning to taste

garlic salt to taste

Morton sea salt (coarse)

black pepper to taste

9 oz (255 g) fresh sugar snap peas

Instructions:

Choose one of two seasonings: 1) Montreal Steak or 2)  Rosemary lemon-pepper.

Brush one side of the breasts with about 1/2 tbsp olive oil. For Rosemary-style chicken, sprinkle the breasts with lemon-pepper seasoning, sea salt, and pepper to taste. Garnish with rosemary sprigs.

For Montreal-style, that seasoning is all you need; it already contains salt and pepper. Rosemary sprigs are optional.

Then cook the breasts in a sous vide device (see video) at 142°F for two hours.

When that’s done, my wife likes to sear the breasts in a frying pan (with a little olive oil) over medium-high heat, 1–2 minutes on each side. The chicken is fully cooked after two hours in the sous vide device, but the searing may enhance the flavor and appearance. It’s optional.

When the chicken is close to being done, sauté the garlic in two oz of olive oil over medium high heat for a minute or two, then add the sugar snap peas and a little garlic salt and pepper to taste, and cook for two to four minutes, stirring frequently.

Number of servings: 2

AMD boxes: 1 veggie, 2 fat, 1 protein

Nutritional analysis per serving:

Calories: 500

Calorie breakdown: 42% fat, 8% carbohydrate, 50% protein

Carb grams: 10

Fiber grams: 4

Digestible carb grams: 6

Prominent nutrients: protein, B6, iron, niacin, pantothenic acid, phosphorus, selenium

 

 

 

 

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Recipe: Rosemary Roasted Brussels Sprouts

Final product without Parmesan sprinkles. That's sous vide chicken in the foreground.

Final product without Parmesan sprinkles. That’s sous vide chicken in the foreground, making this a complete meal for me.

At my request, my wife bought me a mess o’ Brussels sprouts, and I’ve been experimenting with recipes.

Sprouts sliced in half

Sprouts sliced in half

Ingredients this time are the sprouts, dried rosemary (i.e., not fresh although it grows where I live), salt, pepper, extra virgin olive oil, fresh garlic, and diced onion.

FYI, rosemary is used as an ornamental landscaping plant in southern Arizona.

To promote release of flavor, I sautéed three garlic cloves and the rosemary in EVOO.

Releasing the flavors of garlic and rosemary over medium heat for perhaps 3 minutes

Releasing the flavors of garlic and rosemary over medium heat for perhaps 3 minutes

Then I sliced the sprouts in half along their long axis, to reduce cooking time. (Cut them so the leaves stay attached to the internal stalk.) You’d have to cut them in half before you eat ’em anyway.

I dumped all ingredients into a bowel and mixed thoroughly to ensure the sprouts were coated with oil.

Ready for the oven

Ready for the oven. I used about 3/4 cup of diced onion.

Everything except the bowl was transferred to a cooking sheet covered with aluminum foil (easy clean-up!), which I then popped into an oven pre-heated to 425°F. I cooked for 25 minutes. At around the 10 and 17-minute marks, I pulled the concoction out of the oven and stirred/flipped the ingredients to promote even cooking and browning. Your cooking time will vary from 17 to 25 minutes depending on your preferences. If you want some browning of the sprouts, you likely need to cook longer than 17 minutes. Unless your oven runs hotter than mine.

This is my favorite roasted Brussels sprouts recipe thus far. For an extra flavor zing, sprinkle with some Parmesan cheese just before eating. In the future, I may  top the ingredients with some other type of cheese a minute before the cooking is completed. Bacon bits are another tasty option.

Steve Parker, M.D.

Not "real" Parmesan from Italy. For example, this one contains cellulose "to prevent caking."

Not “real” Parmesan from the Parma region of Italy. For example, this one contains cellulose “to prevent caking.”

 

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Rutabaga / Swede/ Neeps : How will you serve this low-carb vegetable?

Jan over at The Low Carb Diabetic is getting me motivated to try a new vegetable: rutabaga.

Click the link below for Jan’s post for more photos and recipes.

“The picture above shows what Americans know as “rutabaga”. The Scottish call it “neeps” and serve it with haggis. I know it as swede, a fairly recent root vegetable, which is thought to have originated around the 17th century in Bohemia. In 1620 a Swiss botanist described the root vegetable, believed to be a hybrid of the cabbage and the turnip. By 1664 it was growing in England. A good source of vitamin.C, fibre, folate and potassium. It’s low in calories.”

Source: The Low Carb Diabetic: Swede / Rutabaga : How will you serve this low carb vegetable

Do you like rutabagas?

PS: If the copyright owner of the rutabaga photo wants me to take it down, contact Steve Parker, M.D., and it shall be done post haste.

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