Category Archives: Carbohydrate

Carbohydrate-Restricted Eating Increased Risk of Type 2 Diabetes!?

Eating this reduces risk of type 2 diabetes?

This is a real head-scratcher for me, just based on the abstract. I can’t explain or write-off the researchers findings at this point. I hope they administered the food frequency questionnaire more than once. If not, I can’t take this seriously.

Highlights

•Of 9689 middle-aged Australian women, 10% developed type 2 diabetes over 15 years.

•Carbohydrate restriction was associated with a 27% higher risk of type 2 diabetes.

•This association was attenuated after adjustment for BMI.

•The association was comparable for women with and without prior gestational diabetes.

•Women should be advised to avoid carbohydrate restricted diets low in fruit and grains.

Abstract

Background and aims

Low-carbohydrate diets (LCDs) are increasingly popular but may be nutritionally inadequate. We aimed to examine if carbohydrate restriction in midlife is associated with risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM), and if this association differs by previous gestational diabetes (GDM) diagnosis.

Methods and results

Dietary intake was assessed for 9689 women from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health in 2001 (aged 50–55) and 2013 (aged 62–67) via validated food frequency questionnaires. Average long-term carbohydrate restriction was assessed using a low-carbohydrate diet score (highest quartile (Q4) indicating lowest proportion of energy from carbohydrates). Incidence of T2DM between 2001 and 2016 was self-reported at 3-yearly surveys. Log-binomial regression was used to estimate relative risks (RR) and 95% CIs. During 15 years of follow-up, 959 women (9.9%) developed T2DM. Carbohydrate restriction was associated with T2DM after adjustment for sociodemographic factors, history of GDM diagnosis and physical activity (Q4 vs Q1: RR 1.27 [95% CI 1.10, 1.48]), and this was attenuated when additionally adjusted for BMI (1.10 [0.95, 1.27]). Carbohydrate restriction was associated with lower consumption of fruit, cereals and high-fibre bread, and lower intakes of these food groups were associated with higher T2DM risk. Associations did not differ by history of GDM (P for interaction >0.15).

Conclusion

Carbohydrate restriction was associated with higher T2DM incidence in middle-aged women, regardless of GDM history. Health professionals should advise women to avoid LCDs that are low in fruit and grains, and to consume a diet in line with current dietary recommendations.

Source: Carbohydrate restriction in midlife is associated with higher risk of type 2 diabetes among Australian women: A cohort study – Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases

Steve Parker, M.D.

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Diabetic Diet: When Low Carb Eating Backfires

Caprese salad: mozzarella cheese, tomatoes, basil, extra virgin olive oil

Healthline has an article by Christina Crowder Anderson, a certified diabetes educator and pediatric registered dietitian nutritionist. It’s worth your time. A snippet:

While I was in my dietetic internship at Duke University, I met a person with diabetes who had morbid obesity and who had participated in Dr. Eric Westman’s “low carb clinic.” They did well on that regimen until they ended up gaining back all the weight plus some, along with a resurgence in their type 2 diabetes.

At that moment, my iron-clad nutrition paradigm started to shift, as the sadness and shame from “diet failure” was palpable. Most individuals would say they “didn’t try hard enough.” But when you meet an actual person and hear their story, you’ll learn there are many factors that play into their success with a specific dietary approach.

Even though I was moved by this experience, my practice philosophies still didn’t change in terms of my recommended dietary approach for type 1 or type 2 diabetes — low carbohydrate. Over the next few years as I worked in a pediatric and adult endocrinology clinic, I steered most patients toward the more severe end of the “low carbohydrate spectrum” and was enthralled by the ability of the low carb approach to produce a flat line continuous glucose monitor (CGM) tracing.

That was, until I worked with 10 young adults in a clinical trial (for my graduate thesis), who chose to participate for a total of 8 months: 3 months on the low carbohydrate diet (60 to 80g day), 2 months of a “washout” period back on their own preferred diet, and another 3 months on the “standard diabetes diet” of >150 g carbs per day.

Source: When Low Carb Eating Backfires for Diabetes

Steve Parker, M.D.

low-carb mediterranean diet

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Do Low-Carb Diets Cause Psychological Disorders? #LCHF

Not in Iranians at least (that’s where the study was done). From Nutrition Journal:

Adherence to the low carbohydrate diet, which contains high amount of fat and proteins but low amounts of carbohydrates, was not associated with increased odds of psychological disorders including depression, anxiety and psychological distress. Given the cross-sectional nature of the study which cannot reflect causal relationships, longitudinal studies, focusing on types of macronutrients, are required to clarify this association.

Source: Adherence to low carbohydrate diet and prevalence of psychological disorders in adults | Nutrition Journal | Full Text

At Longhorn Steakhouse in Amarillo, TX

I’d have been surprised if the researchers did find a linkage. But you don’t know for sure until y0u do the science.

Steve Parker, M.D.

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Both Low- and High-Carb Diets May Kill You

In the research at hand, low-carb was defined as under 40% of calories from carbohydrate, and high-carb was over 70% of calories.

Garlic Naan, a type of flat bread, definitely high-carb

The longevity sweet spot was 50-55% of calories from carbs. You know what? That’s the typical carb percentage in the traditional Mediterranean diet.

If you want to eat low-carb, read more below to identify the possibly healthier substitutions for carbs. Tl;dr version: Eat plant-derived protein and fats.

From a 2018 study in The Lancet Public Health:

Background

Low carbohydrate diets, which restrict carbohydrate in favour of increased protein or fat intake, or both, are a popular weight-loss strategy. However, the long-term effect of carbohydrate restriction on mortality is controversial and could depend on whether dietary carbohydrate is replaced by plant-based or animal-based fat and protein. We aimed to investigate the association between carbohydrate intake and mortality.

Methods

We studied 15 428 adults aged 45–64 years, in four US communities, who completed a dietary questionnaire at enrolment in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study (between 1987 and 1989), and who did not report extreme caloric intake (4200 kcal per day for men and 3600 kcal per day for women). The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. We investigated the association between the percentage of energy from carbohydrate intake and all-cause mortality, accounting for possible non-linear relationships in this cohort. We further examined this association, combining ARIC data with data for carbohydrate intake reported from seven multinational prospective studies in a meta-analysis. Finally, we assessed whether the substitution of animal or plant sources of fat and protein for carbohydrate affected mortality.

Findings

During a median follow-up of 25 years there were 6283 deaths in the ARIC cohort, and there were 40 181 deaths across all cohort studies. In the ARIC cohort, after multivariable adjustment, there was a U-shaped association between the percentage of energy consumed from carbohydrate (mean 48·9%, SD 9·4) and mortality: a percentage of 50–55% energy from carbohydrate was associated with the lowest risk of mortality. In the meta-analysis of all cohorts (432 179 participants), both low carbohydrate consumption (70%) conferred greater mortality risk than did moderate intake, which was consistent with a U-shaped association (pooled hazard ratio 1·20, 95% CI 1·09–1·32 for low carbohydrate consumption; 1·23, 1·11–1·36 for high carbohydrate consumption). However, results varied by the source of macronutrients: mortality increased when carbohydrates were exchanged for animal-derived fat or protein (1·18, 1·08–1·29) and mortality decreased when the substitutions were plant-based (0·82, 0·78–0·87).

Interpretation

Both high and low percentages of carbohydrate diets were associated with increased mortality, with minimal risk observed at 50–55% carbohydrate intake. Low carbohydrate dietary patterns favouring animal-derived protein and fat sources, from sources such as lamb, beef, pork, and chicken, were associated with higher mortality, whereas those that favoured plant-derived protein and fat intake, from sources such as vegetables, nuts, peanut butter, and whole-grain breads, were associated with lower mortality, suggesting that the source of food notably modifies the association between carbohydrate intake and mortality.

Source: Dietary carbohydrate intake and mortality: a prospective cohort study and meta-analysis – The Lancet Public Health

Steve Parker, M.D.

PS: These types of studies are often unreliable.

 

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Dr David Unwin Explains Why He Favors Low-Carb Eating as Best Diet for Type 2 Diabetes

 

diabetic diet, Paleobetic diet, diabetes,

Sunny’s Super Salad

The Diet Doctor website posted a video interview of Dr David Unwin (in the U.K.) discussing his experience with low-carb diets in folks with diabetes (type 2, I assume). If  you’re short on time, just read the transcript. Thanks, Diet Doctor!

I took note of Dr Unwin’s transformation from a run-of-the mill follow-the-herd practitioner to a low-carb advocate. This happened around 2012 when Dr Unwin was 55 years old and on the threshold of retirement. Here it is:

Dr David Unwin speaking: ….There was one particular case I’ve talked about before where there was a patient who – so in 25 years I’d never seen a single person put their [type 2] diabetes into remission, I had not seen it once. I didn’t even really know it was possible.

Dr Bret Scher speaking:  We were not [taught] that it’s possible.

Dr Unwin:  No, my model was that the people with diabetes… It was a chronic deteriorating condition and I could expect that they would deteriorate and I would add drugs and that’s what would be normally going to happen. And then one particular patient wasn’t taking her drugs and she actually went on the low-carb diet and put her diabetes into remission.

But she confronted me with, you know, “Dr. Unwin, surely you know that actually sugar is not a good thing for diabetes.” “Yes, I do.” But then she said, “But you’ve never once in all the years mentioned that really bread was sugar, did you.” And, you know, I never did. I don’t know what my excuse was. So this this lady had done this wonderful thing and she’d also changed her husband’s life as well.

She’d sorted his diabetes out and she’d done it with a low-carb diet and that really made me think I didn’t know much about it. I didn’t know much about it. So I found out what she’d been on… on the low-carb forum of diabetes.co.uk and to my amazement there was 40,000 people on there, all doing this amazing thing. And I was blown away but then I was very sad because the stories of the people online were full of doctors who are critical of these people’s achievements.

***

Dr Unwin: And that original case that showed me you could put into remission; if you could repeat that, how wonderful for people… And when I now – because I think we’ve done 60 patients who put their type 2 diabetes into remission. So I’m able to say with confidence to people, you know, you stand a good chance. In fact I can say that of my patients who take up low-carb, about 45% of them will put their diabetes into remission which is amazing.

At no point does the transcript indicate they’re talking about type 2 diabetes rather than type 1, but that must be the case. Nor does it mention the amount of required carbohydrate restriction. I figure it’s between 20 and 100 grams/day of digestible carbohydrate, depending on one’s metabolic health and how many years of diabetes.

I’ve mentioned Dr Unwin before.

Source: Diet Doctor Podcast #33 – Dr. David Unwin – Diet Doctor

Steve Parker, M.D.

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Can Diet Alter Your Gut Bacteria and Thereby Lower Your Risk of Dementia?

The short answer? We don’t know.

Low-carb salad

The gut bacteria (aka microbiome) seem to be able to decrease or increase inflammation that could cause or exacerbate Alzheimer’s dementia. The  microbiome’s effect on inflammation depends on the species of bacteria present, and the amount of those bacteria. At least one study found that Alzheimer’s patients have a greater abundance of the pro-inflammatory species and less of the anti-inflammatory species, compared to other folks.

Researchers with Wake Forest School of Medicine tried to find answers to the questions in the title of this post. (Click for full text.) They studied 17 experimental subjects, average age 64, who had mild cognitive impairment (11) or “cogni/subjective memory complaints” (6). God bless them for submitting to three spinal taps apiece. The experimental diets were 1) Mediterranean-Ketogenic (under 20 g carb/day), or 2) Low-fat American Heart Association diet (under 40 g fat/day). Participants were on each diet for six weeks.

The investigators didn’t find anything useful for those of us trying today to avoid Alzheimer’s or prevent the progression of mild cognitive impairment to dementia. Their bottom line is, “The data suggest that specific gut microbial signatures may depict [characterize] the mild cognitive impairment and that the modified Mediterranean-ketogenic diet can modulate the gut microbiome and metabolites in association with improved Alzheimer’s disease biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid.”

So we won’t know for several more years, if ever, whether intentional modification of diet will “improve” our gut microbiomes, leading to lower risk of dementia.

What we have known for many year, however, is that the traditional Mediterranean diet is linked to lower risk of Alzhiemer’s dementia.

For more details, see Science Daily:

In a small pilot study, the researchers identified several distinct gut microbiome signatures — the chemicals produced by bacteria — in study participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) but not in their counterparts with normal cognition, and found that these bacterial signatures correlated with higher levels of markers of Alzheimer’s disease in the cerebrospinal fluid of the participants with MCI.

Through cross-group dietary intervention, the study also showed that a modified Mediterranean-ketogenic diet produced changes in the gut microbiome and its metabolites that correlated with reduced levels of Alzheimer’s markers in the members of both study groups.

Source: Diet’s effect on gut bacteria could play role in reducing Alzheimer’s risk — ScienceDaily

Steve Parker, M.D.

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If you own this book, you already have a ketogenic Mediterranean diet.

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ADA Is Starting to Embrace Low-Carb Eating

 

Beautiful, huh? Radishes are a non-starchy vegetable.

From Diabetes Care

Consensus recommendations:

A variety of eating patterns (combinations of different foods or food groups) are acceptable for the management of diabetes.

Until the evidence surrounding comparative benefits of different eating patterns in specific individuals strengthens, health care providers should focus on the key factors that are common among the patterns:

○ Emphasize nonstarchy vegetables.

○ Minimize added sugars and refined grains.

○ Choose whole foods over highly processed foods to the extent possible.

Reducing overall carbohydrate intake for individuals with diabetes has demonstrated the most evidence for improving glycemia and may be applied in a variety of eating patterns that meet individual needs and preferences.

For select adults with type 2 diabetes not meeting glycemic targets or where reducing antiglycemic medications is a priority, reducing overall carbohydrate intake with low- or very low-carbohydrate eating plans is a viable approach.

Source: Nutrition Therapy for Adults With Diabetes or Prediabetes: A Consensus Report | Diabetes Care

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Do Diabetics Need as Many Carbs as Other Folks?

From Diabetes Care:

Do carbohydrate needs differ for people with diabetes compared with the general population?

Carbohydrate is a readily used source of energy and the primary dietary influence on postprandial blood glucose. Foods containing carbohydrate—with various proportions of sugars, starches, and fiber—have a wide range of effects on the glycemic response. Some result in an extended rise and slow fall of blood glucose concentrations, while others result in a rapid rise followed by a rapid fall. The quality of carbohydrate foods selected—ideally rich in dietary fiber, vitamins, and minerals and low in added sugars, fats, and sodium— should be addressed as part of an individualized eating plan that includes all components necessary for optimal nutrition.The amount of carbohydrate intake required for optimal health in humans is unknown. Although the recommended dietary allowance for carbohydrate for adults without diabetes (19 years and older) is 130 g/day and is determined in part by the brain’s requirement for glucose, this energy requirement can be fulfilled by the body’s metabolic processes, which include glycogenolysis, gluconeogenesis (via metabolism of the glycerol component of fat or gluconeogenic amino acids in protein), and/or ketogenesis in the setting of very low dietary carbohydrate intake.

Source: Nutrition Therapy for Adults With Diabetes or Prediabetes: A Consensus Report | Diabetes Care

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What’s the Optimal Diet for Type 1 Diabetes?

A mess of Bacon Bit Brussels Sprouts: 6 grams of fiber per serve

Dr. Muccioli over at Diabetes Daily posted a brief article on a recent research study. A snippet:

The authors found that a higher intake of fiber was associated with lower average blood glucose values. In contrast, a higher intake of carbohydrate, alcohol, and monounsaturated fat was negatively associated with glycemic control (these patients typically experienced more variability in their blood glucose levels). Finally, the analysis revealed that “substituting proteins for either carbohydrates, fats, or alcohol, or fats for carbohydrates, were all associated with lower variability in the measured blood glucose values.”

Source: Which Dietary Patterns Are Best for Type 1 Diabetes Control? – Diabetes Daily

Eaton and Konner figured the Paleolithic diet provided over 70 g/day of fiber. How much are we in the West eating now? Something like 15–20 grams.

Steve Parker, M.D.

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Very Low Carbohydrate Diets for Diabetes (ADA 2018)

This Avocado Chicken soup is low-carb. Use the search box to find the recipe.

Over at Diabete Daily, Dr Maria Muccioli wrote about recent low-carb diet research as applied to diabetes. A couple excerpts to whet your appetite:

Dr. Tay stated that a very low carbohydrate diet offers a considerable advantage over a high carbohydrate approach for patients with type 2 diabetes.She noted that reducing medication use is not only cost-effective but can also safeguard from the considerable side effects of some second-line medications. She also explained that achieving less glycemic variability, which may be an independent risk factor for the development of diabetes-associated complications, is “of great clinical importance.”“It is a good diet to have if you have diabetes, and the data support that,” she concluded.

  *   *   *

What about VLC diet for children with type 1 diabetes?

Dr. de Bock does not deny that a VLCD for children with type 1 diabetes can help to achieve exceptional glycemic control, as recently demonstrated in a study showing normal average A1c levels in a large cohort of patients. The speaker remarked that the patients in that study had very low glycemic variability.

He believes that more research needs to be conducted to evaluate the relevance of the potential concerns that he outlined. Until then, he advises parents of children who follow a VLCD to work closely with their medical care providers to monitor growth, cardiac, nutritional, and mental/emotional parameters.

Source: Very Low Carbohydrate Diets for Diabetes (ADA 2018)

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