Sofia Norton Debunks 21 Weight-Loss Myths

Click the link below for her article at Kiss My Keto. The preamble:

Before we dive into the weight loss myths, it’s important to state the truth about weight loss.It’s not as simple as eating healthy and following an exercise program.

Of course, those can make a big difference, however, it doesn’t work that way for everyone.

There are so many factors that come into play when it comes to weight loss. Some of those factors include genetics, endocrine disorders, medications, insomnia, and cultural reasons.

This is why women with the polycystic ovarian syndrome may find it harder to lose weight than those who don’t have it.

So the next time you come across a trending weight loss tip, pause for a moment, and research about it to see if it’s even true. Secondly, analyze your current situation to see if this particular weight loss strategy will work for you.

Source: 21 Popular Weight Loss Myths Debunked! – Kiss My Keto

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Can Diet Reduce Your Gingivitis and Periodontitis?

Yes...at least according to a tiny short-term study done in Germany. Only 10 experimental subjects.

Here’s their description of the food: “…low in carbohydrates, rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, and rich in vitamins C and D, antioxidants and fiber for four weeks.” How low in carbs? To a level “as far as possible to a level < 130 grams/day.” Click the link above for full diet details. It looks to me like a paleo diet.

Certified paleo-compliant, plus high omega-3 fatty acids and low-carb

The researchers note in the body of their report that they can’t tell for sure which components of the experimental diet were most helpful, but they suspect it’s 1) the carbohydrate restriction, 2) increased omega-3 fatty acids, and 3) reduced omega-6 consumption.

Those three factors are at play in the both the Paleobetic Diet and Low-Carb Mediterranean Diet.

Here’s the study’s abstract for you science nerds:

Background

The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of four weeks of an oral health optimized diet on periodontal clinical parameters in a randomized controlled trial.

Methods

The experimental group (n = 10) had to change to a diet low in carbohydrates, rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, and rich in vitamins C and D, antioxidants and fiber for four weeks. Participants of the control group (n = 5) did not change their dietary behavior. Plaque index, gingival bleeding, probing depths, and bleeding upon probing were assessed by a dentist with a pressure-sensitive periodontal probe. Measurements were performed after one and two weeks without a dietary change (baseline), followed by a two week transitional period, and finally performed weekly for four weeks.

Results

Despite constant plaque values in both groups, all inflammatory parameters decreased in the experimental group to approximately half that of the baseline values (GI: 1.10 ± 0.51 to 0.54 ± 0.30; BOP: 53.57 to 24.17 %; PISA: 638 mm2 to 284 mm2). This reduction was significantly different compared to that of the control group.

Conclusion

A diet low in carbohydrates, rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, rich in vitamins C and D, and rich in fibers can significantly reduce gingival and periodontal inflammation.

Thanks to BioMed Central for making the entire report available for free.

Reference:

An oral health optimized diet can reduce gingival and periodontal inflammation in humans – a randomized controlled pilot study

  • J. P. WoelberEmail author,
  • K. Bremer,
  • K. Vach,
  • D. König,
  • E. Hellwig,
  • P. Ratka-Krüger,
  • A. Al-Ahmad and
  • C. Tennert
BMC Oral Health 2016, 17:28

https://doi.org/10.1186/s12903-016-0257-1

Published: 26 July 2016

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Short-Term Metabolic Effects of Low-Carb Versus High-Carb Diet In Type 1 Diabetes

Shrimp Salad

A scientific study published 2017 compared a high-carb (at least 250 grams/day) to low-carb diet (50 grams or less) in 10 patients with type 1 diabetics. The low-carb diet yielded more time in the normal blood sugar range, less hypoglycemia, and less variability of glucose levels.

I assume the low-carb diet required less insulin, but I don’t know since I haven’t seen the full article. Let me know if you can confirm.

In case you’re wondering, the Paleobetic diet provides about 60 grams of carb daily, and the Low-Carb Mediterranean Diet ranges from 20 t0 100 grams.

Here’s the abstract:

The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of a high carbohydrate diet (HCD) vs a low carbohydrate diet (LCD) on glycaemic variables and cardiovascular risk markers in patients with type 1 diabetes. Ten patients (4 women, insulin pump-treated, median ± standard deviation [s.d.] age 48 ± 10 years, glycated haemoglobin [HbA1c] 53 ± 6 mmol/mol [7.0% ± 0.6%]) followed an isocaloric HCD (≥250 g/d) for 1 week and an isocaloric LCD (≤50 g/d) for 1 week in random order. After each week, we downloaded pump and sensor data and collected fasting blood and urine samples. Diet adherence was high (225 ± 30 vs 47 ± 10 g carbohydrates/d; P < .0001). Mean sensor glucose levels were similar in the two diets (7.3 ± 1.1 vs 7.4 ± 0.6 mmol/L; P = .99). The LCD resulted in more time with glucose values in the range of 3.9 to 10.0 mmol/L (83% ± 9% vs 72% ± 11%; P = .02), less time with values ≤3.9 mmol/L (3.3% ± 2.8% vs 8.0% ± 6.3%; P = .03), and less glucose variability (s.d. 1.9 ± 0.4 vs 2.6 ± 0.4 mmol/L; P = .02) than the HCD. Cardiovascular markers were unaffected, while fasting glucagon, ketone and free fatty acid levels were higher at end of the LCD week than the HCD week. In conclusion, the LCD resulted in more time in euglycaemia, less time in hypoglycaemia and less glucose variability than the HCD, without altering mean glucose levels.

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Seniors, Preserve Your Muscle Mass as You Lose Weight

dementia, memory loss, Mediterranean diet, low-carb diet, glycemic index, dementia memory loss

“Honey, please come to the gym with me.”

We’ve known for a while that resistance training helps preserve muscle mass in younger folks during weight-loss programs. I’ve always figured the principle applied to older folks, too. Now we have proof. Average age of these study participants was 67.

From UPI.com:

Seniors who want to lose weight should hit the weight room while they cut calories, a new study suggests.

Older folks who performed resistance training while dieting were able to lose fat but still preserve most of their lean muscle mass, compared with those who walked for exercise, researchers report.

“The thought is if you lose too much lean mass, that this will exacerbate risk of disability in older adults,” said lead researcher Kristen Beavers, an assistant professor of health and exercise science at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, N.C. “Our findings show if your treatment goal is to maximize fat loss and minimize lean mass loss, then the resistance training is probably the way to go.”

 

 

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Should You Restrict Sodium Intake?

I’m still not convinced that severe sodium restriction is necessary or even possible for most people

U.S public health authorities recommend maximum daily sodium consumption of 2.3 grams a day, in order to prevent cardiovascular disease. But a 2018 multi-country study published in Lancet supports a much different and higher maximum sodium intake level:

Sodium intake was associated with cardiovascular disease and strokes only in communities where mean intake was greater than 5 g/day. A strategy of sodium reduction in these communities and countries but not in others might be appropriate.

The researchers also found, “All major cardiovascular outcomes decreased with increasing potassium intake in all countries.”

Click for a list of potassium-rich foods from a .gov website.

You’ll find several cold-water fatty fish there.

My Low-Carb Mediterranean Diet recommends the fish but you’ll find no sodium restriction advice.

Source: Urinary sodium excretion, blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, and mortality: a community-level prospective epidemiological cohort study – The Lancet

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What’s the Best Diet For Diabetes?

From a recent Diabetes Care journal article:

“The Consensus Report highlights the role of weight management, dietary patterns, and technology-enabled tools in diabetes prevention and management. There is a clear consensus on reducing intake of added sugars, sodium, and unhealthy fats, especially trans fat, in the diet, although the panel does not recommend a “one-size-fits-all” eating plan. Instead, multiple eating patterns including the Mediterrranean diet, DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet, and vegetarian and low-carbohydrate diets can be used for weight and diabetes management. However, the quality and food sources of the macronutrients are among the most critical factors determining the efficacy and long-term outcomes of these diets.”

Source: Nutritional Strategies for Prevention and Management of Diabetes: Consensus and Uncertainties | Diabetes Care

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8 Scientific Health Benefits of the Mediterranean Diet 

There are reasons I adapted the Mediterranean diet for folks with diabetes. the article linked below lists some of them.

“If there’s one so-called diet that is widely acclaimed for its health benefits, it’s the Mediterranean diet. In fact, U.S. News & World Report ranked the Mediterranean diet No. 1 on its 2019 41 Best Diets Overall list, citing a “host of health benefits, including weight loss, heart and brain health, cancer prevention, and diabetes prevention and control.” More of an eating pattern than a calorie-restricted diet, the Mediterranean regimen emphasizes eating lots of vegetables, fruits, nuts, legumes, seeds, and fish, with liberal use of olive oil, a moderate amount of dairy foods, and a low amount of red meat — a way of eating common in Mediterranean countries such as Spain, Italy, and Greece, noted an article published in June 2018 the journal Current Atherosclerosis Reports.”

Source: 8 Scientific Health Benefits of the Mediterranean Diet | Everyday Health

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