Two sons REVERSED their father’s T2 diabetes by making him cut out pasta and bread 

DailyMail.com has the story.

BTW, you’ll read below about body weight expressed in “stones.” That’s a term used in the UK and Ireland. One stone equals 14 pounds or 6.35 kilograms.

Click the link below for more details. Here’s a snippet:

“The story of how Anthony and his younger brother Ian, 37, a documentary maker, intervened to bring their father back from the brink is told in a powerful new BBC film, called Fixing Dad.

The searingly honest documentary is a salutary tale for the 3.6 million people with Type 2 diabetes in the UK.

With his family’s help Geoff believes he has managed to ‘reverse’ the disease: he now weighs 13 stone and his blood sugar levels are so low he no longer needs diabetes medication.

His sons believe this may not have happened had they not stuck Geoff on an 800-calorie-a-day diet for eight weeks, an approach pioneered by Professor Roy Taylor of Newcastle University’s Diabetes Research Group.They also dramatically slashed his carbohydrate intake — by banning pasta and bread — after studies in the journals Nutrition & Metabolism and Diabetologia in 2008 and 2012 found this may be one of the best approaches to reset the release of insulin to safe levels again.”

Source: These sons REVERSED their fathers diabetes by making him cut out pasta and bread | Daily Mail Online

Steve Parker, M.D.

PS: Here’s more info on the Newcastle Diet.

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FDA Advisory Panel Recommends Continuous Glucose Monitors

Most users of these devices have type 1 diabetes, but I saw a type 2 recently who had one.

“An FDA advisory panel voted 8-2 that the benefits of using a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) device as a replacement for fingerstick blood glucose testing for diabetic patients outweigh the risks.

They also voted 8-2 that there was a “reasonable assurance” that the expanded indication for the device — a fifth generation CGM from Dexcom currently approved for use as an adjunct to fingersticks — would be safe, and 9-1 that it would be effective. If approved, the broadened use would allow patients to make decisions about their care solely by checking the interstitial fluid glucose concentration values, something many patients reported already doing.”

Source: FDA Panel Says Yes to Expanded CGM Use | Medpage Today

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Almost Two of Every Ten U.S. Teens Has Prediabetes

“Fewer than 1% of U.S. teens have diabetes, but nearly 18% have pre-diabetes, according to a new analysis of data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).Researchers tested 2,606 adolescents, ages 12 to 19, for diabetes and found that the weighted prevalence was 0.8%, of which 28.5% of cases were undiagnosed, according to Andy Menke, PhD, of Social & Scientific Systems in Silver Spring, Md., and colleagues.”

Source: Pre-Diabetes Prevalent Among U.S. Teens | Medpage Today

Among U.S. adolescents with diabetes, 90% of it is type 1.

Prediabetes tends to progress into type 2 diabetes over time. We don’t know much about stopping that in adolescents. I bet these steps would help:

  1.  If you’re overweight or obese, lose excess fat weight. How much should you lose? Aim for at least 5% of body weight and see if that cures your prediabetes. For instance, if you weigh 200 lb (91 kg), lose 10 lb (4.5 kg).
  2. If you’re sedentary, start exercising regularly.
  3. Cut back on your consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, other sugar sources, and other refined carbohydrates like wheat flour.

Steve Parker, M.D.

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No Clear Survival Differences Seen Between Diabetes Drugs

"How about this one?"

“How about this one?”

A multinational group of researchers tried to determine which drugs for type 2 diabetes were better at prolonging life and preventing cardiovascular deaths. They reviewed the existing literature (i.e., they did a meta-analysis of prior clinical studies.

There are no clear winners. Placebo worked as well as the eight drug classes examined!

Unfortunately, the abstract doesn’t say how long the clinical studies lasted, only mentioning that they were at least 24 weeks long. It’s quite possible it would take at least three to five years to see an effect on death rates.

Click the source link at the bottom of the page for details at MPT.

Selected quotes:

“Eight different diabetes drug classes examined in a meta-analysis failed to demonstrate improved cardiovascular or all-cause mortality compared with placebo.Researchers analyzed 301 randomized clinical trials of patients with type 2 diabetes, and found that, metformin outperformed some other drug classes for its effect on hemoglobin A1c levels, there were no significant differences in mortality — including when placebo was included as a drug class.”

***

“A central finding in this meta-analysis was that despite more than 300 available clinical trials involving nearly 120,000 adults and 1.4 million patient-months of treatment, there was limited evidence that any glucose-lowering drug stratified by coexisting treatment prolonged life expectancy or prevented cardiovascular disease,” the authors wrote.”

***

“The authors wrote that their findings are consistent with guidelines from the American Diabetes Association, which — like the algorithm from the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists — recommend that metformin monotherapy be used for the initial treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes. “Based on this review, clinicians and patients may prefer to avoid sulfonylureas or basal insulin for patients who wish to minimize hypoglycemia, choose GLP-1 receptor agonists when weight management is a priority, or consider SGLT-2 inhibitors based on their favorable combined safety and efficacy profile,” the authors wrote.”

Source: No Clear Survival Benefit Seen Among Diabetes Drugs | Medpage Today

Open wide!

Open wide!

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“The World’s Most Cutting-Edge Fat-Burning Performance Meal Plan: The Keto Diet”

Odd cover, huh?

Odd cover, huh?

Men’s Fitness has an article extolling the virtues of ketogenic diets, particularly as they relate to athletic performance. Sadly, the piece doesn’t mention my Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet, which is incorporated into The Advance Mediterranean Diet (2nd ed.) and Conquer Diabetes and Prediabetes.

The article focuses on Professor Timothy Noakes (who also has an M.D. degree. Some quotes:

“Noakes’s war on sugar goes back a generation, to when his father developed type-2 diabetes. Type-2 is a disease in which the body gradually loses its ability to regulate blood sugar through the production of the hormone insulin. It’s linked to genetics, but also to diet—particularly sugar and refined carbs—as well as obesity and inactivity. Diabetes experts estimate that the disease speeds up the aging process by roughly a third, damaging the body from the inside out. Too much blood sugar slowly destroys blood vessels, with results ranging from mild—early wrinkling of skin—to catastrophic: heart disease, blindness, stroke, amputations due to poor circulation, and even Alzheimer’s disease (more on that later).

Noakes’ father eventually died from type-2, but because Noakes himself followed a low-fat diet, exercised regularly (he’s run upward of 70 marathons, as well as a handful of ultras), and didn’t smoke, he figured he’d be spared. To be sure, as he got older he put on some weight, and his energy sagged, but he was in good shape.

Regardless, in 2010, Noakes was diagnosed with type-2 diabetes. Though he didn’t know it yet, a lifetime of well-intentioned carbo- loading for his athletic endeavors had set him up for a fall.”

Source: The Truth Behind the World’s Most Cutting-Edge Fat-Burning Performance Meal Plan: The Keto Diet

CDP front cover_Amazon

AMD-2-EBook-Front Cover

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New Scientific Review: Mediterranean Diet Helps Control Diabetes and Reduce Heart Disease

Conquer Diabetes and Prediabetes, Steve Parker MD

Olive oil and vinegar: prominent features of the Mediterranean diet

“The Mediterranean diet can be described as a dietary pattern characterized by the high consumption of plant-based foods, olive oil as the main source of fat, low-to-moderate consumption of fish, dairy products and poultry, low consumption of red and processed meat, and low-to-moderate consumption of wine with meals. The American Diabetes Association and the American Heart Association recommend Mediterranean diet for improving glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes. Prospective studies show that higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with a 20-23 % reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes, while the results of randomized controlled trials show that Mediterranean diet reduces glycosylated hemoglobin levels by 0.30-0.47 %, and is also associated with a 28-30 % reduced risk for cardiovascular events.”

Source: Mediterranean diet for type 2 diabetes: cardiometabolic benefits. – PubMed – NCBI

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Are You Visiting This Site From India?

Gadi Sagar temple on Gadisar lake at sunset, Jaisalmer, India

Gadi Sagar temple on Gadisar Lake, Jaisalmer, Rajasthan, India

I’ve been surprised by how many blog visitors I get from India—often more than I see from U.K, Canada, or Australia.

If you’re Indian, is there anything in particular you’d like to see me address here? Leave a comment below or email me at steveparkermd AT gmail.com. Thank you.

Steve Parker, M.D.

PS: Please let me know if you are aware of a good source of low-carb Indian recipes in English. I have a growing interest in curries.

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