Management of Type 1 Diabetes With a Very Low–Carbohydrate Diet 

diabetic diet, low-carb mediterranean diet

Long-term diabetes management begins in the kitchen

From the medical journal Pediatrics:

“Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate glycemic control among children and adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) who consume a very low–carbohydrate diet (VLCD).

METHODS: We conducted an online survey of an international social media group for people with T1DM who follow a VLCD. Respondents included adults and parents of children with T1DM. We assessed current hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) (primary measure), change in HbA1c after the self-reported beginning of the VLCD, total daily insulin dose, and adverse events. We obtained confirmatory data from diabetes care providers and medical records.

RESULTS: Of 316 respondents, 131 (42%) were parents of children with T1DM, and 57% were of female sex. Suggestive evidence of T1DM (based on a 3-tier scoring system in which researchers took into consideration age and weight at diagnosis, pancreatic autoimmunity, insulin requirement, and clinical presentation) was obtained for 273 (86%) respondents. The mean age at diagnosis was 16 ± 14 years, the duration of diabetes was 11 ± 13 years, and the time following a VLCD was 2.2 ± 3.9 years. Participants had a mean daily carbohydrate intake of 36 ± 15 g. Reported mean HbA1c was 5.67% ± 0.66%. Only 7 (2%) respondents reported diabetes-related hospitalizations in the past year, including 4 (1%) for ketoacidosis and 2 (1%) for hypoglycemia.

CONCLUSIONS: Exceptional glycemic control of T1DM with low rates of adverse events was reported by a community of children and adults who consume a VLCD. The generalizability of these findings requires further studies, including high-quality randomized controlled trials.”

Source: Management of Type 1 Diabetes With a Very Low–Carbohydrate Diet | Articles | Pediatrics

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Food Versus Feed

Future Feed

From Hawaiian Libertarian:

“Food is grown, raised, harvested and processed — and if not consumed while fresh — preserved in as natural and organic a state as possible to keep most of it’s nutritious and nourishing qualities intact.

Feed is mass produced by a few large multinational corporations line using bio-technological innovations to quickly and efficiently manufacture product units ready for global distribution and a near infinite shelf life. Its primary traits are using genetically modified grain products to create a marketable product that is usually adulterated with preservatives and flavor enhancements that give it a long shelf life in airtight packaging and designed in a laboratory to stimulate the taste buds to fool the human body into thinking it’s something good for you.

But above all, the primary difference between Food and Feed can be discerned by this: most real food requires little (if any) corporate mass media marketing campaigns to sell product and expand market shares and waistlines alike.”

Source: Hawaiian libertarian: FEED Inc. & The Corporate Campaign Dialectic

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Is It True That “Diets Don’t Work”?

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Recipe: Sous Vide Chicken and Sauteed Sugar Snap Peas

Sous vide chicken and sautéed sugar snap peas

Click the pic for our YouTube demonstration.

This is so low-carb that you can eat it in a ketogenic diet.

Ingredients:

2 boneless skinless chicken breasts, 8-9 oz each (225-255 g each) (raw weight)

2.5 tbsp (37 ml) extra virgin olive oil

few sprigs of fresh rosemary (optional)

2 cloves garlic, diced

lemon-pepper seasoning

Montreal Steak Seasoning to taste

garlic salt to taste

Morton sea salt (coarse)

black pepper to taste

9 oz (255 g) fresh sugar snap peas

Instructions:

Choose one of two seasonings: 1) Montreal Steak or 2)  Rosemary lemon-pepper.

Brush one side of the breasts with about 1/2 tbsp olive oil. For Rosemary-style chicken, sprinkle the breasts with lemon-pepper seasoning, sea salt, and pepper to taste. Garnish with rosemary sprigs.

For Montreal-style, that seasoning is all you need; it already contains salt and pepper. Rosemary sprigs are optional.

Then cook the breasts in a sous vide device (see video) at 142°F for two hours.

When that’s done, my wife likes to sear the breasts in a frying pan (with a little olive oil) over medium-high heat, 1–2 minutes on each side. The chicken is fully cooked after two hours in the sous vide device, but the searing may enhance the flavor and appearance. It’s optional.

When the chicken is close to being done, sauté the garlic in two oz of olive oil over medium high heat for a minute or two, then add the sugar snap peas and a little garlic salt and pepper to taste, and cook for two to four minutes, stirring frequently.

Number of servings: 2

AMD boxes: 1 veggie, 2 fat, 1 protein

Nutritional analysis per serving:

Calories: 500

Calorie breakdown: 42% fat, 8% carbohydrate, 50% protein

Carb grams: 10

Fiber grams: 4

Digestible carb grams: 6

Prominent nutrients: protein, B6, iron, niacin, pantothenic acid, phosphorus, selenium

 

 

 

 

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The Mediterranean Ketogenic Lifestyle – By Dr. Colin Champ

Colin Champ, M.D., published and article on his version of a Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet.

“The Study Participants – The Mediterannean Ketogenic Lifestyle

Regardless, the study was a massive success, as it allowed 40 overweight individuals with an average BMI of 37 to switch from their diabetes-provoking diet containing over 50% carbohydrates for 12 weeks. Ketosis was apparently confirmed via ketone strips in the morning. This concerns me, because if they were urine strips, after 2-3 weeks they would have been inaccurate. Once again, we must question whether it was a ketogenic diet or simply a very low-carbohydrate diet. Yet, the proof is it the pudding as the Spanish Ketogenic dieters experienced an average reduction in bodyweight from 240 to 208 lbs. Most importantly, there was a clear loss of fat over muscle. Blood pressure dropped, blood lipids improved, triglycerides divebombed as they were cut in half, blood sugar dropped by almost 20 mg/dl, and HDL cholesterol – a difficult number to budge – rose significantly. Take note, as expected, the largest reduction overall was the massive drop in triglycerides, which is especially important as elevated triglycerides are strongly associated with an increased risk of stroke, heart disease, and cancer.

Globally, all of these changes are desired. The question I pose, is can we take this a step further to encourage a full-blown Mediterranean Ketogenic Diet? I have been following what I consider a Mediterranean Ketogenic Diet for years by combining the cultural and social aspects of my Southern Italian heritage along with the scientific approach of the ketogenic diet. Sounds complicated? It’s not. In fact, it is so simple, that I have distilled it down to seven steps that are so simple, your great-grandfather likely followed most of them (mine certainly did).”

Source: The Mediterranean Ketogenic Lifestyle – Colin Champ

Compare with my version.

Odd cover, huh?

 

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Obesity Paradox: Diabetes Seems to Forestall Death In the Overweight and Obese

The study was done in the U.K.

Highlights

•What is the association between BMI and mortality in people with and without diabetes mellitus?

•Compared to normal BMI, the risk of death was a 33% lower in overweight people with diabetes and 12% lower in those without.

•For obese class I, the risk was 35% lower in diabetes and 5% lower in non-diabetes.

•For obese class III, the risk was a 10% non-significantly lower in diabetes and 29% higher in non-diabetes.

•For the same level of obesity, mortality risk was higher in non-diabetes than in diabetes.

Source: Body mass index and mortality in people with and without diabetes: A UK Biobank study – Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases

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Insulin Pumps Decrease Quality of Life and Increase HgbA1c in CGM Users 

Technological advances aren’t always worth the cost…

“A new randomized study compared insulin pump therapy vs. an MDI [multiple daily injections] approach among current CGM [continuous glucose monitor] users. The results showed that insulin pump users had a higher A1c, decreased quality of life, and markedly higher medical expenses as compared to MDI patients.”

Source: Study: Insulin Pumps Decrease Quality of Life and Increase A1c in CGM Users – Diabetes Daily

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