Outrageous Drug Costs in the U.S.

I don’t have the resources to confirm the figures below, but I won’t be surprised if accurate. From Public Interest on Twitter:

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Lower carb eating is likely to reduce the need for diabetes drugs.

Steve Parker, M.D.

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What’s the Optimal Diet for Type 1 Diabetes?

A mess of Bacon Bit Brussels Sprouts: 6 grams of fiber per serve

Dr. Muccioli over at Diabetes Daily posted a brief article on a recent research study. A snippet:

The authors found that a higher intake of fiber was associated with lower average blood glucose values. In contrast, a higher intake of carbohydrate, alcohol, and monounsaturated fat was negatively associated with glycemic control (these patients typically experienced more variability in their blood glucose levels). Finally, the analysis revealed that “substituting proteins for either carbohydrates, fats, or alcohol, or fats for carbohydrates, were all associated with lower variability in the measured blood glucose values.”

Source: Which Dietary Patterns Are Best for Type 1 Diabetes Control? – Diabetes Daily

Eaton and Konner figured the Paleolithic diet provided over 70 g/day of fiber. How much are we in the West eating now? Something like 15–20 grams.

Steve Parker, M.D.

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Filed under Carbohydrate, Fat in Diet, Protein

Is Weight Training Better Than Aerobics for Heart Health?

One…..more…..rep!

“Lifting weights is healthier for the heart than going for a run or a walk, new research has found. Scientists looking at the health records of more than 4,000 people have concluded that, while both forms of exercise reduce the risk of developing heart disease, static activities such as weight lifting or press-ups [push-ups] have a greater effect than an equivalent amount of dynamic exercise such as running, walking or cycling.

The research challenges commonly held assumption that so-called “cardiovascular” pursuits like running are of greatest benefit to the heart.”

Source: Weight lifting better for heart health than running, new study finds

I like these findings, but wonder if they can be replicated.

Steve Parker, M.D.

low-carb mediterranean diet

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Mediterranean Diet Associated with 41% Risk Reduction for Age-Related Macular Degeneration, a Common Cause of Blindness

Photo of the retina at the back of the eyeball, where macular degeneration occurs

Not news to me…

“Protecting a patient’s eyes may be more heavily influenced by diet than previously thought. A new study, which analyzed data from a pair of previous study populations, found that people aged 55 and over who maintained a Mediterranean-style diet reduced their risk of developing late-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by 41%.”

Source: Mediterranean Diet Associated with 41% Risk Reduction for AMD | MD Magazine

low-carb mediterranean diet

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Lack of Fitness Is Worse for Your Health Than Smoking, Diabetes, and Heart Disease

exercise for weight loss and management, dumbbells

At least he’s trying…

I’ve long advocated that life and health insurance companies base their premiums on results of individual treadmill exercise tests or similar. Here’s why.

From CNN:

We’ve all heard exercise helps you live longer. But a new study goes one step further, finding that a sedentary lifestyle is worse for your health than smoking, diabetes and heart disease.

Dr. Wael Jaber, a cardiologist at the Cleveland Clinic and senior author of the study, called the results “extremely surprising.”

“Being unfit on a treadmill or in an exercise stress test has a worse prognosis, as far as death, than being hypertensive, being diabetic or being a current smoker,” Jaber told CNN. “We’ve never seen something as pronounced as this and as objective as this.”

Source: Not exercising worse for your health than smoking, diabetes and heart disease – CNN

Most folks can improve their fitness by exercising regularly. But what about nonresponders?

Steve Parker, M.D.

PS: All of my weight-loss books recommend and teach you how to improve your level of fitness.

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New Systematic Review Concludes Omega-3 Fatty Acids Have NO EFFECT On Cardiovascular Disease and Longevity

Conquer Diabetes and Prediabetes, Steve Parker MD

Salmon is a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids

That headline is the conclusion of a Cochrane systematic review of the evidence. As you read the summary below, be aware that the main omega-3 fatty acids are alpha-lenolenic acid (ALA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA).

From Cochrane Library:

Increasing EPA and DHA has little or no effect on all‐cause deaths and cardiovascular events (high‐quality evidence) and probably makes little or no difference to cardiovascular death, coronary deaths or events, stroke, or heart irregularities (moderate‐quality evidence, coronary events are illnesses of the arteries which supply the heart). EPA and DHA slightly reduce serum triglycerides and raise HDL (high‐quality evidence).

Eating more ALA (for example, by increasing walnuts or enriched margarine) probably makes little or no difference to all‐cause or cardiovascular deaths or coronary events but probably slightly reduce cardiovascular events, coronary mortality and heart irregularities (moderate/low‐quality evidence). Effects of ALA on stroke are unclear as the evidence was of very low quality.

There is evidence that taking omega‐3 capsules does not reduce heart disease, stroke or death. There is little evidence of effects of eating fish. Although EPA and DHA reduce triglycerides, supplementary omega‐3 fats are probably not useful for preventing or treating heart and circulatory diseases. However, increasing plant‐based ALA may be slightly protective for some heart and circulatory diseases.

Source: Omega‐3 fatty acids for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease – Abdelhamid, AS – 2018 | Cochrane Library

These findings are contrary to my views. I’m not sure who’s right. I still aim for cold-water fatty fish consumption twice a week.

Steve Parker M.D.

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Filed under Fat in Diet, Fish, Heart Disease

Lowering Blood Pressure to 120 Systolic May Reduce Age-Related Memory Loss, Even Dementia

Exercise also seems to protect against memory loss and dementia

Keep your eyes on this development, folks. Potential game-changer. And a boon to Big Pharma. From NBCnews.com…

Lowering blood pressure to recommended levels can prevent dementia and the memory and thinking problems that often show up first [mild cognitive impairment], researchers reported Wednesday.

People whose top blood pressure reading was taken down to 120 were 19 percent less likely to develop mild cognitive impairment, the loss of memory and brain processing power that usually precedes Alzheimer’s, the study found. And they were 15 percent less likely to eventually develop cognitive decline and dementia.

***

It may take a few more years before the study conclusively shows whether the risk of Alzheimer’s was actually reduced because of the lower blood pressure,the researchers said.

It’s the first intervention that has been clearly demonstrated to lower rates of mental decline.

***

The findings come from a large trial of blood pressure called the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial, or SPRINT.

It has already found that lowering systolic blood pressure — the top number in a blood pressure reading — to 120 or less can prevent stroke, heart attacks, kidney disease and other problems.

Source: Tight blood pressure control can cut memory loss, study finds

Steve Parker, M.D.

PS: The Mediterranean diet also protects against dementia.

low-carb mediterranean diet

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