Julianne Figured Out Why the French Aren’t Fat

Julianne Taylor has a fascinating blog post based on a trip to France and Great Britain. Julianne is a dietitian living in New Zealand.  Please read the entire article.

Her conclusions:

“What can we learn from the French way of eating?

Don’t snack. At all. Eat 3 balanced meals, and snack only if needed.

Planned snacks are fine, children always have an after school snack, or small meal in France. Treat the snack with the same respect as you would a meal.

Don’t eat anywhere other than at a table. Don’t eat walking around, at your desk, in front of the TV, or snack out of the fridge. Prepare, then eat a meal at a table, preferably with company and actually experience the process of savoring your food. Eat slowly.

Choose food freshly prepared from whole ingredients like protein, fruit and vegetables.

Model eating like this to your children, and don’t push them into our bad habits. Enjoy family meals together at the table without any screens or phones.

Treat food is fine, savor a small portion as part of a meal if you wish.

Water should be the main drink, wine in moderation can be enjoyed with meals if desired,”

Source: Eating habits in France, what we should copy | Julianne’s Paleo & Zone Nutrition

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Vegetarian Diet Improves Diabetic Neuropathy Pain

http://www.nature.com/nutd/journal/v5/n5/full/nutd20158a.html

plus major weight loss

h/t bix (fanatic cook)

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Forty Years of Dietary Advice Down the Drain – Buh-Bye!

Dr. Axel Sigurdsson is a cardiologist who focuses his blogging on cardiovascular disease and lipid disorders. I bet he agrees with me that dietary saturated fat is not the malevolent force we were taught in medical school.

From his blog:

“The [PURE study] suggests that placing carbohydrates at the bottom of the food pyramid based on their effect on blood cholesterol was a mistake. In fact, the data show that replacing dietary carbohydrates with different types of fat may improve lipid profile.

In an interview on Medscape, Dr. Mahshid Dehghan, the principal author of the abstract said: “To summarize our findings, the most adverse effect on blood lipids is from carbohydrates; the most benefit is from consumption of monounsaturated fatty acids; and the effect of saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids are mixed. I believe this is a big message that we can give because we are confusing people with a low-fat diet and all the complications of total fat consumption, and WHO and AHA all suggest 55% to 60% of energy from carbohydrates.”

Today, most experts agree that diets high in saturated fatty acids or refined carbohydrates are not be recommended for the prevention of heart disease. However, it appears that carbohydrates are likely to cause a greater metabolic damage than saturated fatty acids in the rapidly growing population of people with metabolic abnormalities associated with obesity and insulin resistance.”

Source: High Carbohydrate Intake Worse than High Fat for Blood Lipids

PS: A diet naturally high in monounsaturated fat is one you may have heard of: the Mediterranean diet. A low-carb Mediterranean diet is the cornerstone of Conquer Diabetes and Prediabetes.

High MUFA, Low CARB

High MUFA, Low CARB

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From P.D. Mangan: How Much Alcohol Is Too Much?

“Is the room spinning, or is it just me?”

He reviewed the recent scientific literature and concludes:

“Heavy drinking has well-defined adverse effects, but we’re told that moderate drinking of a couple drinks daily may be protective when it comes to heart disease.Moderate drinking may be protective, or there may just be an association among intelligence, health, and drinking. And the protective effect of alcohol with regard to heart disease is typically seen in older populations and/or those who have a high background risk of heart disease.If you’re in-shape and/or less than old, alcohol probably won’t decrease your risk of heart disease.

However, moderate drinking can cause other illnesses, including cancer.I’m forced to conclude that the benefits of alcohol have been overblown. However, in moderate drinking, the risks may be small — nonetheless, they are there.

Don’t fool yourself that your moderate drinking is good for you. It facilitates social interaction, makes you temporarily less anxious — but good for your health? Seems doubtful.”

Source: How Much Alcohol Is Too Much? – Rogue Health and Fitness

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I Solved America’s Narcotic Use Epidemic. You’re Welcome.

Not your typical street-level drug pusher, but a great source of hydrocodone (e.g., Norco)

The mainstream news outlets in the U.S. tell us we are in the midst of a narcotic use epidemic, an “opioid crisis.” What’s worse, folks are dropping like flies from overdoses.

I’m talking about oxycodone, hydrocodone, hydromorphone (Dilaudid), morphine, fentanyl, heroin, etc. Not Xanax, Ativan, or Valium.

On average, it takes three weeks of daily narcotic use to get physically dependent on it. This means that when you stop the drug completely and suddenly, your body may crave it and you could have withdrawal symptoms. The severity of withdrawal symptoms varies from person to person. Possible symptoms include anxiety, sweating, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, restless legs, weakness, easy fatigue, shaking, suicidal thoughts, insomnia, and muscle pain or cramps.

Good and bad news, bad news first: Narcotic withdrawal can be very uncomfortable but rarely causes medically serious complications. The serious complications are usually in folks with pre-existing heart disease, high blood pressure, low blood pressure, or heart rhythm disturbances.

Here’s how you stop your chronic daily narcotic habit without suffering a withdrawal syndrome (if needed, see the postscript for an example):

  1. Total up your current total daily dose in milligrams
  2. Determine 10% of the amount by dividing the milligrams by 10
  3. Reduce your daily milligram intake by that 10% every week
  4. Nine weeks later you’ll be off narcotics

Congratulations! You’ve done your part to solve America’s opioid use epidemic. You’ve reduced your drug bill, avoided Opiate Use Disorder, and reduced your risk of narcotic overdose death by 100%. And you did it without political meddling or an expensive stay at a detox center.

Be aware that as you taper off your narcotic, you may have a flare of an underlying psychiatric condition such as depression, anxiety, PTSD, bipolar disorder, panic attacks, or psychosis. If so, see a mental health professional posthaste.

Good luck, America!

Steve Parker, M.D.

PS: As an example or narcotic tapering, let’s consider Percocet 10/325. It’s 10 mg of oxycodone and 325 mg of acetaminophen. Say you’re taking Percocet 10/325, four pills at at time, four times a day. That’s a total daily oxydocodone dose of 160 mg (16 pills x 10 mg). 160 mg divided by 10 = 16 mg. We have to round off 16 mg to 15 mg due to the availability of various strengths of Percocet. So starting today, you reduce your daily oxycontin dose by 15 g, which is one-and-a-half pills. After one week, you reduce your daily pill count by another one-and-a-half pills. Etc.

PPS: Let you’re doctor know what you’re doing beforehand. He’ll be overjoyed and ensure it’s safe for you to do this taper.

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Potatoes Don’t Cause Diabetes, Obesity, or Cardiovascular Disease

…according to researchers in Denmark who reviewed the scientific literature. But watch out for french fries.

“The identified studies do not provide convincing evidence to suggest an association between intake of potatoes and risks of obesity, T2D, or CVD. French fries may be associated with increased risks of obesity and T2D although confounding may be present. In this systematic review, only observational studies were identified. These findings underline the need for long-term randomized controlled trials.”

Source: Potatoes and risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease in apparently healthy adults: a systematic review of clinical intervention and observational studies

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Experts Advice: How To Better Cope With Diabetes

“Life is hectic as it is. There is the stress of school, the stress of job, the stress of doing a good job, the stress of being a good parent, child, friend, employee… you name it.

However, imagine, the added level of stress one has to deal with when it comes to diabetes and its management.

Having diabetes can cause both physical and emotional stress on the body, which in turn can further deteriorate ones’ health. When you are stressed, your blood sugar levels rise. When your blood levels rise, we all know the implications and complications it can cause to your body.

In order to respond better to our readers. we recently interviewed experts in the field of mental health for some of their wise advise.

We asked 28 experts (psychologists and psychiatrists) to answer the following question we are asked often: How people with diabetes can better cope with the stress that diabetes can lead to?

Please read below their responses.”

Source: 28 Experts Share Their Advice: How To Better Cope With Diabetes

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