Recipe: Sous Vide Chicken and Sauteed Sugar Snap Peas

Sous vide chicken and sautéed sugar snap peas

Click the pic for our YouTube demonstration.

This is so low-carb that you can eat it in a ketogenic diet.

Ingredients:

2 boneless skinless chicken breasts, 8-9 oz each (225-255 g each) (raw weight)

2.5 tbsp (37 ml) extra virgin olive oil

few sprigs of fresh rosemary (optional)

2 cloves garlic, diced

lemon-pepper seasoning

Montreal Steak Seasoning to taste

garlic salt to taste

Morton sea salt (coarse)

black pepper to taste

9 oz (255 g) fresh sugar snap peas

Instructions:

Choose one of two seasonings: 1) Montreal Steak or 2)  Rosemary lemon-pepper.

Brush one side of the breasts with about 1/2 tbsp olive oil. For Rosemary-style chicken, sprinkle the breasts with lemon-pepper seasoning, sea salt, and pepper to taste. Garnish with rosemary sprigs.

For Montreal-style, that seasoning is all you need; it already contains salt and pepper. Rosemary sprigs are optional.

Then cook the breasts in a sous vide device (see video) at 142°F for two hours.

When that’s done, my wife likes to sear the breasts in a frying pan (with a little olive oil) over medium-high heat, 1–2 minutes on each side. The chicken is fully cooked after two hours in the sous vide device, but the searing may enhance the flavor and appearance. It’s optional.

When the chicken is close to being done, sauté the garlic in two oz of olive oil over medium high heat for a minute or two, then add the sugar snap peas and a little garlic salt and pepper to taste, and cook for two to four minutes, stirring frequently.

Number of servings: 2

AMD boxes: 1 veggie, 2 fat, 1 protein

Nutritional analysis per serving:

Calories: 500

Calorie breakdown: 42% fat, 8% carbohydrate, 50% protein

Carb grams: 10

Fiber grams: 4

Digestible carb grams: 6

Prominent nutrients: protein, B6, iron, niacin, pantothenic acid, phosphorus, selenium

 

 

 

 

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The Mediterranean Ketogenic Lifestyle – By Dr. Colin Champ

Colin Champ, M.D., published and article on his version of a Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet.

“The Study Participants – The Mediterannean Ketogenic Lifestyle

Regardless, the study was a massive success, as it allowed 40 overweight individuals with an average BMI of 37 to switch from their diabetes-provoking diet containing over 50% carbohydrates for 12 weeks. Ketosis was apparently confirmed via ketone strips in the morning. This concerns me, because if they were urine strips, after 2-3 weeks they would have been inaccurate. Once again, we must question whether it was a ketogenic diet or simply a very low-carbohydrate diet. Yet, the proof is it the pudding as the Spanish Ketogenic dieters experienced an average reduction in bodyweight from 240 to 208 lbs. Most importantly, there was a clear loss of fat over muscle. Blood pressure dropped, blood lipids improved, triglycerides divebombed as they were cut in half, blood sugar dropped by almost 20 mg/dl, and HDL cholesterol – a difficult number to budge – rose significantly. Take note, as expected, the largest reduction overall was the massive drop in triglycerides, which is especially important as elevated triglycerides are strongly associated with an increased risk of stroke, heart disease, and cancer.

Globally, all of these changes are desired. The question I pose, is can we take this a step further to encourage a full-blown Mediterranean Ketogenic Diet? I have been following what I consider a Mediterranean Ketogenic Diet for years by combining the cultural and social aspects of my Southern Italian heritage along with the scientific approach of the ketogenic diet. Sounds complicated? It’s not. In fact, it is so simple, that I have distilled it down to seven steps that are so simple, your great-grandfather likely followed most of them (mine certainly did).”

Source: The Mediterranean Ketogenic Lifestyle – Colin Champ

Compare with my version.

Odd cover, huh?

 

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Obesity Paradox: Diabetes Seems to Forestall Death In the Overweight and Obese

The study was done in the U.K.

Highlights

•What is the association between BMI and mortality in people with and without diabetes mellitus?

•Compared to normal BMI, the risk of death was a 33% lower in overweight people with diabetes and 12% lower in those without.

•For obese class I, the risk was 35% lower in diabetes and 5% lower in non-diabetes.

•For obese class III, the risk was a 10% non-significantly lower in diabetes and 29% higher in non-diabetes.

•For the same level of obesity, mortality risk was higher in non-diabetes than in diabetes.

Source: Body mass index and mortality in people with and without diabetes: A UK Biobank study – Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases

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Insulin Pumps Decrease Quality of Life and Increase HgbA1c in CGM Users 

Technological advances aren’t always worth the cost…

“A new randomized study compared insulin pump therapy vs. an MDI [multiple daily injections] approach among current CGM [continuous glucose monitor] users. The results showed that insulin pump users had a higher A1c, decreased quality of life, and markedly higher medical expenses as compared to MDI patients.”

Source: Study: Insulin Pumps Decrease Quality of Life and Increase A1c in CGM Users – Diabetes Daily

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Skipping Breakfast May Increase Your Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

“In total 6 studies, based on 96,175 participants and 4935 cases, were included. The summary RR for type 2 diabetes comparing ever with never skipping breakfast was 1.33 (95% CI: 1.22, 1.46, n = 6 studies) without adjustment for BMI, and 1.22 (95% CI: 1.12, 1.34, n = 4 studies) after adjustment for BMI. Nonlinear dose-response meta-analysis indicated that risk of type 2 diabetes increased with every additional day of breakfast skipping, but the curve reached a plateau at 4–5 d/wk, showing an increased risk of 55% (summary RR: 1.55; 95% CI: 1.41, 1.71). No further increase in risk of type 2 diabetes was observed after 5 d of breakfast skipping/wk (P for nonlinearity = 0.08).

Conclusions

This meta-analysis provides evidence that breakfast skipping is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, and the association is partly mediated by BMI.”

Source: Breakfast Skipping Is Associated with Increased Risk of Type 2 Diabetes among Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies | The Journal of Nutrition | Oxford Academic

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Diabetes and Prediabetes Linked to Higher Heart Failure Risk

From NMCD:

Highlights

•A meta-analysis of 77 prospective studies was conducted.

•Diabetes was associated with a 2-fold increase in heart failure risk in the general population.

•Diabetes was associated with a 69% increase in heart failure risk in patient populations.

•Elevated blood glucose even in the pre-diabetic range also increased heart failure risk.

Source: Diabetes mellitus, blood glucose and the risk of heart failure: A systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies – Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases

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Reasons Why It Took SySy So Long to Transition to Very Low Carb Eating

From Sysy Morales at Diabetes Daily:

“My blood sugar levels have never been better than what they are now. This is primarily due to eating a very low-carb diet. It took me a long time to transition, and this post will outline the reasons why.

Over a decade ago I read Dr. Bernstein’s book called, Dr. Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution. When he explained what he calls the Laws of Small Numbers, which refers to how small amounts of carbohydrate are covered by small doses of insulin and this means that blood sugars are more easily managed within tight parameters. He also explained why keeping blood sugar levels within tight parameters is essential to avoid complications. This made sense immediately, and I responded by flinging the book across my bedroom at the wall.”

Source: Reasons Why It Took Me So Long to Transition to Very Low Carb

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