Night shift work does NOT raise breast cancer risk, new study finds

MNT has the details:

“In 2007, the World Health Organization published a review that concluded night shift work is likely to raise the risk of cancer, particularly breast cancer. A new review of more than 1.4 million women challenges this conclusion, after revealing night shift work had little or no impact on breast cancer incidence.

Working night shifts has little or no impact on women’s risk of breast cancer, a new study suggests.Study co-author Dr. Ruth Travis, of the Cancer Epidemiology Unit at Oxford University in the United Kingdom, and colleagues publish their findings in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), around 15 million adults in the United States work full-time night shifts, rotating shifts, or other irregular schedules.It is well established that such working patterns can disrupt the body’s circadian rhythm – the physical, mental, and behavioral changes that occur over a 24-hour cycle, which mainly respond to light and dark in the environment.

Circadian rhythm disruption has been associated with an array of health problems, including sleep disorders, obesity, diabetes, depression, and bipolar disorder.”

Source: Night shift work ‘does not raise breast cancer risk,’ study finds – Medical News Today

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J&J insulin pump vulnerable to hacking

If you’re one of the 114,000 users of this device in the U.S. or Canada, listen up:

“Johnson & Johnson is telling patients that it has learned of a security vulnerability in one of its insulin pumps that a hacker could exploit to overdose diabetic patients with insulin, though it describes the risk as low.

Medical device experts said they believe it was the first time a manufacturer had issued such a warning to patients about a cyber vulnerability, a hot topic in the industry following revelations last month about possible bugs in pacemakers and defibrillators.

J&J executives told Reuters they knew of no examples of attempted hacking attacks on the device, the J&J Animas OneTouch Ping insulin pump. The company is nonetheless warning customers and providing advice on how to fix the problem.”

Source: J&J warns diabetic patients: Insulin pump vulnerable to hacking | Reuters

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FDA approves “artificial pancreas” for type 1 diabetes

CNN has a few details on the Medtronic MiniMed 670G, which should be available to consumers this spring:

“The Food and Drug Administration approved a so-called artificial pancreas Wednesday. The first-of-its-kind device, the size of a cell phone, monitors and treats patients with type 1 diabetes, also known as juvenile diabetes.In those with type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, a hormone people need to get energy from food. The Medtronic MiniMed 670G system continuously monitors glucose (blood sugar) levels and delivers needed insulin to patients.

“This is a revolutionary day for the treatment of diabetes. We’ve been long awaiting the artificial pancreas, and it’s exciting to see it,” said Dr. Robert Courgi, an endocrinologist at Northwell Health’s South Side Hospital in Bay Shore, New York.”

Source: ‘Artificial pancreas’ for type 1 diabetes wins FDA approval –

Cost and insurance coverage issues should be interesting.

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Overweight Women Lose More Weight If Main Meal Is Lunch Rather Than Dinner

Conquer Diabetes and Prediabetes, Steve Parker MD

It may not matter whether you eat this particular low-carb meal at lunch or dinner

They say that to lose excess weight, you should eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and dinner like a pauper.

A recent study tested whether weight loss in dieting women was more effective by making lunch rather than dinner (evening meal) the main meal of the day. Over the course of 12 weeks, dieters making lunch their main meal lost 4 lb (2 kg) more than the other group. Furthermore, the lunch eaters had better improvement in their insulin resistance (as measured by HOMA-IR)

From the abstract:

“Background: The association between the time of nutrient intake and health has been described in a few studies. To our knowledge, no study has evaluated the relation between high energy intakes at lunch compared with at dinner on weight loss in overweight and obese subjects.

Objective: We compared the effect of high energy intake at lunch with that at dinner on weight loss and cardiometabolic risk factors in women during a weight-loss program.Design: Overweight and obese women [n = 80; body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2): 27–35; age: 18–45 y] were asked to eat either a main meal at lunch (LM) or a main meal at dinner (DM) for 12 wk while in a weight-loss program.

Conclusions: The consumption of higher energy intake at lunch compared with at dinner may result in favorable changes in weight loss in overweight and obese women after a weight-loss program of 12 wk. The consumption may also offer clinical benefits to improve insulin resistance.”

Source: Beneficial effect of high energy intake at lunch rather than dinner on weight loss in healthy obese women in a weight-loss program: a randomized clinical trial

I don’t have the full text of the research report, so I don’t know what kind of diet the women were on. The researchers seem to be based in both Iran and Great Britain. I don’t know the nationality of the women participating. The metabolism of Iranians may be different from Brits.

Steve Parker, M.D.


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Harriet Hall on Plavinol and Other Natural Remedies for Diabetes

Harriet Hall, M.D., looked at the evidence for Plavinol as a diabetes treatment. She’s skeptical about it:

“In a recent article on SBM, Scott Gavura quoted a pharmacy customer who said “I don’t want to take any drugs. Do you have something natural I can use to cut my blood sugar?” Scott went on to cover the questionable evidence for cinnamon in that article. Many other “natural” remedies have been proposed. Here’s an alphabetical list: acetyl L-carnitine, aloe, alpha-lipoic acid, banaba leaf (not banana!), basil, berberine, bilberry, biotin, bitter melon, cinnamon, chromium, coQ10, crepe myrtle, fenugreek, fish oil, fructo-oligosaccharides, green tea, ginseng, glucomannan, gymnema, hibiscus, Indian kino tree extract, magnesium, mistletoe, olive leaf, onion, psyllium, purslane, resveratrol, starch blockers, thiamine, vanadium, and vitamins. I compiled that list from just three websites; I’m sure there are many more natural remedies that I missed. These natural remedies have been recommended on the basis of rather shaky preliminary evidence that they lower blood sugar, usually by only a small amount. Even the CAM-friendly National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) concluded: “There is not enough scientific evidence to suggest that any dietary supplements can help prevent or manage type 2 diabetes.”

Source: Plavinol and Other Natural Remedies for Diabetes: “Condimentary Medicine”? « Science-Based Medicine

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P.D. Mangan on Processed Food, Supernormal Stimuli, and Obesity 

Supernormal stimulus

Supernormal stimulus

Read the whole thing (link below). It’s not long. A snippet:

“The obesogenic nature of the kind of foods that most people eat means that you must largely avoid them.

Because of the supernormal stimuli embedded in them, the best course of action in my opinion is to avoid them at all costs. Supernormal stimuli cause addiction, and they may make your steak and eggs, foods that you should be eating, less appealing.

For most people, unless they have plenty of money to throw around, this means preparing food and eating at home. Avoid the center of the grocery store, where processed junk and soda are sols, and shop around the outside, where you’ll find whole, unprocessed food like meat, cheese, eggs, and vegetables.”

Source: Processed Food, Supernormal Stimuli, and Obesity – Rogue Health and Fitness

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New research: Mediterranean diet linked to reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and death

This tower is in Pisa, Italy

This tower is in Pisa, Italy

This won’t surprise you if you’ve been reading this blog for a while:

“Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States, killing around 610,000 people annually. Heart attack affects around 735,000 Americans each year, while around 800,000 people are affected by stroke.

Adopting a healthy diet is considered key for reducing the risk of CVD, and numerous studies have suggested the Mediterranean diet fits the bill.

A study published in the European Heart Journal earlier this year, for example, found older adults who adhered to the Mediterranean diet were at lower risk of heart attack, stroke, and cardiovascular death than those who followed a Western diet.”

Source: Mediterranean diet linked to reduced risk of CVD – Medical News Today

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