Do Diabetics Need as Many Carbs as Other Folks?

From Diabetes Care:

Do carbohydrate needs differ for people with diabetes compared with the general population?

Carbohydrate is a readily used source of energy and the primary dietary influence on postprandial blood glucose. Foods containing carbohydrate—with various proportions of sugars, starches, and fiber—have a wide range of effects on the glycemic response. Some result in an extended rise and slow fall of blood glucose concentrations, while others result in a rapid rise followed by a rapid fall. The quality of carbohydrate foods selected—ideally rich in dietary fiber, vitamins, and minerals and low in added sugars, fats, and sodium— should be addressed as part of an individualized eating plan that includes all components necessary for optimal nutrition.The amount of carbohydrate intake required for optimal health in humans is unknown. Although the recommended dietary allowance for carbohydrate for adults without diabetes (19 years and older) is 130 g/day and is determined in part by the brain’s requirement for glucose, this energy requirement can be fulfilled by the body’s metabolic processes, which include glycogenolysis, gluconeogenesis (via metabolism of the glycerol component of fat or gluconeogenic amino acids in protein), and/or ketogenesis in the setting of very low dietary carbohydrate intake.

Source: Nutrition Therapy for Adults With Diabetes or Prediabetes: A Consensus Report | Diabetes Care

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8 Comments

Filed under Carbohydrate

8 responses to “Do Diabetics Need as Many Carbs as Other Folks?

  1. Jonathan Christie

    “… in the setting of very low dietary carbohydrate intake”

    Truly, pigs can fly – never thought I’d see the day that the ADA acknowledged low carb for glycemic control!

    • Jonathan Christie

      “… in the setting of very low dietary carbohydrate intake”

      Truly, pigs can fly – never thought I’d see the day that the ADA acknowledged low carb for glycemic control!

  2. Richard David Feinman

    Memo to the committee:
    We’re trying to save face. You guys have to say that low-carbohydrates have no health risks and there is no dietary requirement for carbs. But we want you to imply that there is something wrong with them. We suggest putting in a lot of distracting words and many disclaimers. Then slip in low-carb unobtrusively.

    Committee:
    How’s this ?
    “Although the recommended dietary allowance for carbohydrate for adults without diabetes (19 years and older) is 130 g/day and is determined in part by the brain’s requirement for glucose, this energy requirement can be fulfilled by the body’s metabolic processes, which include glycogenolysis, gluconeogenesis (via metabolism of the glycerol component of fat or gluconeogenic amino acids in protein), and/or ketogenesis in the setting of very low dietary carbohydrate intake.”

  3. Pingback: Do Diabetics Need as Many Carbs as Other Folks? - Lean.New.Me.

  4. Ivan

    I have been following the healthy well balanced ADA diet for the past 41 years and have perfect health and no complications.

    • Richard David Feinman

      They deny that they have a diet. They always cop out with individualization. ..when you say “perfect health,” you mean you don’t have diabetes?

  5. Nicky

    My mother and I have been following this diet since 2012. We are not diabetics. She is 84, I am 57. Great for weight, great for blood-pressure, great to not retain fluid – and tasty if you make an effort. My mother has very regular, elaborate health checks. Each time we reduce carbs heavy (as opposed to moderately) we ask the specialists for their opinion of her health and if there is anything she should be doing differently. We don’t mention the ketosis to be sure that the input we get is not influenced by their opinion of the diet. Each time they are very happy to conclude that she is doing just fine.

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